Where to Travel in Italy Based on Your Personality

You made the decision–you’re going to travel to Italy! 

But, before you hop on the plane to live la dolce vita, you have to make one difficult decision: choosing where you will visit. In a country brimming with history, packed with incredible sights, and serving fantastic cuisine, how do you decide where to travel in Italy?

We say let your personality lead the way. Think of this as choosing what part of Italy is best to visit—catered specifically to you. We’ve selected the best regions in Italy based on your interests, so choose one or mix and match to figure out where to go in Italy!

Romantic Travelers—Get swept up in the sheer beauty of it all

The Veneto is a place to travel in Italy when you love to love. Venice, the region’s capital, has picture-perfect canals, while Verona (a.k.a. the City of Love) was the setting for Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Verona may even have an opera while you’re visiting the arena in the heart of town!

The Amalfi Coast is one of the must-see places to visit in Italy, so consider Campania. There you can also explore the rugged landscape of Capri or bathe in the mineral-rich thermal waters of Ischia.

Umbria has dreamy medieval hill towns like Assisi or Perugia, and we highly recommend stopping in beautiful Orvieto. Marvel at the cathedral there, explore the underground caves, and enjoy the view atop the clock tower.

Food First—Let your stomach lead the way

Sicily has a reputation for food travel in Italy and is a place foodies shouldn’t miss. From the arancini to the pasta alla norma, you won’t go hungry there! And Sicilian desserts like a granita or some cannoli are, quite honestly, reason enough to visit Italy.

When looking at where to travel in Italy for the food, eat your way through Emilia Romagna with classics like prosciutto di Parma and Parmigiano-Reggiano. One of our fave food cities is Bologna, which has iconic Italian foods, including tortellini en brodo or mortadella.

Wine Lovers—You love nothing more than a three-hour lunch with excellent vino and vineyard views

Some of the best places to travel in Italy for food and wine include classic regions like Tuscany, Umbria, and Piedmont. The picturesque rolling vineyards look like they’re straight out of a film, and the vino — the Chianti, Barolo, and Barbaresco especially — is divine.

If you prefer Italian sparkling wine, then visit vineyards in Veneto for all things prosecco. For a lesser-known sparkling wine region, Franciacorta in Lombardy will satisfy your desire for premium bubbly.

Our top food destination, Sicily, also suits wine lovers well. Sicilian wine goes well beyond Marsala, so check out our starter guide for Sicilian wine to learn more about this exciting Italian wine region 

Adventure Seekers—Nothing beats the thrill of the outdoors

 In Le Marche, hike spectacular spots like Monti Sibillini or through the Conero Regional Park, including Lame Rosse (considered the Grand Canyon of Le Marche). Visitors can go horseback riding, cycling, or even golfing, and you can lounge on the beaches of the Conero Riviera.

The rural region of Abruzzo is an excellent location to hike, camp, or ski in the winter months. You’ll encounter several world-famous parks teeming with wildlife like Abruzzo National Park, Maiella National Park, and the regional park Sirente Velino.

The mountainous Aosta Valley is a prime skiing destination and includes epic peaks like Monte Bianco and the Matterhorn. Here you’ll find Italy’s first national park, Gran Paradiso National Park, home to the Alpine ibex, a type of wild goat unique to the region 

Trentino Alto-Adige includes the Dolomites and the Alps, so skiers should flock here for a winter trip. This area is still gorgeous in the summer, and it’s a great spot to rent 4WD vehicles or go rock climbing.

Art Aficionados—You want your holiday to feed your creative soul

Florence (in Tuscany) is a dream for art enthusiasts. Witness Renaissance masterpieces like Michaelangelo’s David, Botticelli's Birth of Venus, Ghiberti’s Gates of Paradise firsthand, or experience gems like the lesser-known sculpture museum, Il Bargello Museum.

Fashion capital Milan, in the Lombardy region, will fuel your creative soul. Admire buildings like the Duomo and the Bosco Verticale, experience street art as well as museums like Fondazione Prada and the Bagatti Valsecchi Museum, or visit the city’s many studios and showrooms.

History Buffs—Exploring ancient ruins is your idea of a good time

Both Rome and Ostia are in the Lazio region, and you could spend weeks exploring Italy’s history here! The Colosseum, the Roman Forum, the Pantheon, and the archaeological site of Ostia Antica only scratch the surface of how to experience living history in Italy.

South of Lazio is Campania, where you can marvel at the archaeological site of Pompeii buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. For more history, head to the Naples National Archaeological Museum or the Second Temple of Hera, one of the best-preserved Greek temples in the world.

The arch of Italy’s boot, Basilicata, has been inhabited since the Paleolithic times and may very well be the site of the first human dwellings in the whole country. Matera, the City of Caves, is a system of Neolithic cave dwellings, plus the temple ruins Tavole Palatine are also in the Basilicata region.

Luxury Living—What’s a vacation without a little splurging?

You can really go luxe in Lombardy — there’s a reason George Clooney has a villa on Lake Como! The chic lakes region offers picturesque waterside towns at every turn, and when you want a taste of city life, head down to Milan.

Sun Bums—We’ll catch you swimming in the crystal clear waters of the Mediterranean

If you’re considering how to decide where to go in Italy and beaches are a priority, we can’t get enough of Sardinia. Expect long strips of sand and hidden coves only accessible by hiking or boat, and transparent waters that shimmer in the sunlight.

You’ll find the Italian Riviera in Liguria, right on the Mediterranean. The coastline has countless beaches, plus gorgeous towns (including the five of Cinque Terre) that make this one of the most beautiful places in Italy. 

Italy’s boot, including Puglia and Calabria, gets tons of sun and has hundreds of miles of coastline! Even with Puglia’s growing popularity, you’ll encounter far fewer travelers in either of these beach destinations compared to other spots in Italy.

Off-the-Beaten-Path Travelers—You love discovering the undiscovered

Molise is Italy’s newest region, founded in 1963. As such, tourism infrastructure here can’t compare to famed regions like Lazio or Tuscany — but intrepid travelers can wander through the charming small towns and countryside, as well as countless impressive castles.

Culture Vultures—“Travel like a local” is your mantra

Italy has a few pockets of cultural melting spots like Friuli-Venezia Giulia. This northeastern corner borders Austria and Slovenia, resulting in a mash-up of cultures between multiple countries. 

Similarly, Trentino Alto-Adige used to be part of Austria-Hungary, and here it’s not uncommon to encounter German speakers. It’s an interesting pocket of the country with adorable Alpine villages in Italy’s most famous mountain ranges, the Dolomites and Alps.

What type of personality (or personalities!) inspire your travel style? What region of Italy are you most excited to explore? Comment below and tell us where you’d like to head next!


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Photo Credit: Photo of Matera by FABRIZIO CONTE, Ostia ruins by Ludmila Aire, Dolomites photo by TTstudio

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