{Kanelbullar} Swedish Cinnamon Buns

{Kanelbullar} Swedish Cinnamon Buns

Inspired by Saluhall, Stockholm, Sweden

{Kanelbullar} Swedish Cinnamon Buns  | http://saltandwind.com So, I traveled to Sweden recently —  Stockholm to be exact. I've got Swedish heritage, so I was excited to see where my family comes from, but I w...
Cuisine
Ingredients
12
Hands-On Time
30 minutes
Total Time
2 hours, 30 minutes
Yield
18 rolls
Servings
6 to 18
Diet
Season
{Kanelbullar} Swedish Cinnamon Buns  | http://saltandwind.com
Skill
Intermediate
Course
Breakfast, Brunch, Dessert, Side, Snack
Cuisine
Scandinavian
Ingredients
12
Hands-On Time
30 minutes
Total Time
2 hours, 30 minutes
Yield
18 rolls
Servings
6 to 18
Diet
Vegetarian
{Kanelbullar} Swedish Cinnamon Buns  | http://saltandwind.com

So, I traveled to Sweden recently —  Stockholm to be exact. I've got Swedish heritage, so I was excited to see where my family comes from, but I went in the middle of winter and was nervous about the cold weather, short days, and long nights. Despite my concerns, Sweden exceeded my expectations and I loved every minute. Stockholm is easily one of the most beautiful cities I have ever visited– stunning in both light and darkness with gorgeous architecture and history dating back to the 1200s.

Like so many of us, I travel because I love new food discoveries, and, in Stockholm, I discovered my love for kanelbullar, aka Swedish cinnamon buns. Before my trip, I had only ever tasted kanelbullar at Ikea, exhausted and starving after hours of shopping. Unsurprisingly, the authentic swedish cinnamon buns in Stockholm were infinitely better than the Ikea version. BTW, kanelbullar are more cousin than sibling to American cinnamon rolls. They're not as gooey or rich and never have icing; instead, they’re made with loads of cardamom and cinnamon, and flecked with pearl sugar or sliced almonds.

While in Stockholm, I did not hold back on the kanelbullar especially since they were the perfect excuse to escape the cold and partake in the Swedish tradition of fika, aka coffee break. Kanelbullar are such a part of Swedish culture that it's estimated that the average citizen eats nearly 320 annually, so I think it's safe to say it's in my genes to need me some Swedish cinnamon buns, right? Some of my favorites were at the amazing Saluhall food hall in central Stockholm's Ostermalm district and I hadto recreate them when I returned home. These take a bit of time and patience but they're worth every minute!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons almond milk or whole milk
  • 1 package (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup unrefined granulated sugar

    plus a pinch for the yeast

  • 1 large egg

    plus 1 egg yolk

  • 4 teaspoons vanilla bean paste or extract

    divided

  • 3 teaspoons ground cardamom

    divided

  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 3 1/2 to 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

    plus more for rolling the dough

  • 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter

    room temperature

  • 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon

    divided

  • toasted sliced almonds

    or pearl sugar, for garnish

Instructions

Heat milk to 110° to 115°F degrees then combine with the yeast, and a pinch of granulated sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer. Set aside until foamy, about 5 to 10 minutes. Add the remaining 1/2 cup of granulated sugar, the egg and egg yolk, 2 teaspoons of the vanilla, 2 teaspoons of the cardamom, and 2 teaspoons of the salt then whisk until eggs are broken up and well combined. 

Slowly add 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour to the stand mixer fitted with a dough hook and knead until a soft silky dough forms (Only add as much flour as you need. The dough should be tacky, silky, and a slack enough that it slightly falls on itself when you set it down. If the dough is sticking to you hands after 3 1/2 cups, add remaining 1 cup flour in 2 tablespoons intervals until you have the desired consistency.) Mix in 4 tablespoons of the room temperature butter a few pieces at a time until well incorporated. Shape dough into ball tucking the ends under so the top surface is smooth.

Lightly spray a clean bowl with nonstick spray and roll dough ball in oil. Cover with plastic wrap or damp kitchen towel, set in a warm place and allow to rise until doubled; about 45 minutes to 1 hour at room temperature or overnight in the refrigerator. When ready to form the cinnamon rolls, prepare the filling by combining the remaining 4 tablespoons of room temperature butter, 1/4 cup of the light brown sugar, 3 teaspoons of the ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon of the ground cardamom, 1/2 teaspoon of the vanilla bean paste, and a pinch of salt. Stir until thoroughly mixed.

Tip

If you let the dough rise in the refrigerator, allow the dough to sit out a room temperature for about 1 hour before continuing with the below steps.

Heat oven to 350°F and arrange a rack in the middle. On a lightly floured surface use a rolling pin, to roll the dough a 12-inch-by-18-inch rectangle. Spread the butter-sugar mixture over rectangle all the way to the edge. Along the 18-inch side, mark the dough every 6 inches then use those marks as a guide to gently fold the dough in thirds onto itself so it’s like a closed business letter. Turn the dough so the seam is in front of the you and the open ends are to your right and left. 

Tip

There are two ways you can roll these cinnamon rolls, the traditional way of rolling the dough into a log and slicing then baking or by cutting long strips of dough, twirling the dough around your fingers and creating a knot like roll, which we do here.

Trim the edge of the dough slightly so the rectangle is even then using a very sharp knife or pastry wheel, slice the dough lengthwise into 2 centimeter long strips (you should have about 16 to 18). To form a knotted roll, loop the two times rope over your first two fingers then fold it under to tie it into a knot (check out Fix Feast Flair for pictures as to how to tie the rolls). Let dough rise 30 minutes at room temperature. 

While the buns are rising, combine the remaining 1/4 cup of light brown sugar with 1/4 cup water, the remaining 1/2 teaspoon of ground cardamom (or 3 crushed cardamom pods), remaining 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon (or a 3-inch cinnamon stick), and remaining 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste (or a vanilla bean split lengthwise). Bring to a boil and stir to dissolve then sugar then remove from heat. 

When the rolls are ready to bake, brush tops of each with the spiced simple syrup then sprinkle with pearl sugar or sliced almonds. Bake cinnamon rolls in the oven about 15 to 20 minutes or until golden brown on the bottom and almonds are toasted. Remove from oven, and brush again with the simple syrup; cool slightly before serving. 

Footnotes

More on Salt & Wind

Did you know we lead boutique food and wine tours for food lovers? Come join our next Salt & Wind trip!

P.S. If you liked this story, you'll probably like our newsletter too! 

P.P.S. Did you make this recipe? Give us your thoughts by leaving a comment below and show us how it turned out by sharing it on Instagram with the #swsociety hashtag!

http://saltandwind.com/recipes/291-swedish-cinnamon-rolls-kanelbullar-recipe

Comments